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Posts tagged ‘canon’

16
May

5 Ways To Improve Your Concert Photography~ Nine Inch Nails

1~ Max out the ISO

Newer model DSLR’s have extreme ISO settings with little loss in quality. Don’t be afraid of going 1600 ISO and above. You’ll need it.
2~ Crank up the shutter speed

Keep your shutter speed as high as possible. It’s surprising how quickly performers move onstage. Especially at rock concerts. Try for a minimum of 1/250 sec. You’ll need high ISO and fast lenses to achieve this.

3~ Expose for the subject

Your meter is going want to over-expose your subject. The meter gets thrown off by the dark background combined with a spotlit subject. If you don’t under-expose you’ll get blocked-up highlights on the faces.

4~ Use the “Hail Mary”

When you shoot from the photo pit you’ll be beneath the performers. To get dynamic shots, hold your camera above your head with a wide angle lens on. Blast away!

5~ Carry two camera bodies

One body with a telephoto and one body with a wide angle. You won’t have time to change lenses. Usually you only get three songs so you have to use every second. Plus it’s too dark to see what you’re doing anyway.

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2
May

Paige Lindquist~ Colours From Copper Lane


22
Apr

6 Ways To Improve Your Sports Photography

Sports photography. If you can master it, you’ll improve every aspect of your shooting. Much of your success will depend on what you do before you release the trigger.

1~ Pay attention to the background

More than anything else, this will take your action pictures to the next level. I can tell if a photographer knows what they’re doing just by looking at where they position themselves to shoot. Any busyness in the background will camouflage the action.

2~ Use fast telephoto lenses wide open

Shooting wide open helps to clean up the background and isolates your subject with shallow depth of field. Sports photographers generally do not use a lens slower than f 2.8.

3~ Keep alert

Expect the unexpected. You never know what’s going to happen at a sporting event. Avoid chimping! (editing your photos in camera)

4~ Practice

Great shots don’t happen all the time. When they do, you not only have to be there to capture it, your camera skill has to be impeccable so you don’t miss it. It takes thousands of hours to build a portfolio.

5~ Try a wide angle

Any chance you get. Most sports pictures are telephoto. They all begin to look the same. Ask any picture editor. Stay low to the ground to clean up the background.

6~ Look for something different.

Quirky is what you want. Strange things happen when you freeze action. When shooting and editing, look for unique images that still show both teams and include the puck or ball.

25
Mar

Koko~ Early 90’s Meets “Cowboys and Aliens”

Koko, being a huge Björk fan, wanted to do a shoot with the singer’s 90’s style haircut. I kept with a vintage feel for the shoot. With the iPhone I used the Ina’s 1969 film with the textured border emblematic of a mid-50’s to late 60’s, and the “Cowboys and Aliens” era Libatique 73 lens. 5D Mark II images were post-processed to give a vintage feel with Alien Ski Exposure. Played Björk on the iPhone for the entire shoot. In the 90’s I never dreamed my camera would supply the music as well.

Canon EOS 5D Mark II, Lens: EF85mm f/1.8 USM Post-processed: Alien Skin Exposure (Technicolor Bleach)

iPhone 4s, Lens: Libatique 73 Film: Ina’s 1969

Canon EOS 5D Mark II, Lens: EF17-35mm f/2.8L USM Post-processed: Alien Skin Exposure (Polachrome)

Canon EOS 5D Mark II, Lens: EF85mm f/1.8 USM Post-processed: Alien Skin Exposure (Technicolor Process 2)

iPhone 4s, Lens: Libatique 73 Film: Ina’s 1969

20
Mar

Breaking Into Photojournalism ~ Lenses, It’s About Extremes

This is the first post I’ll be doing for those of you who want to start a career as a photojournalist.

You never know what extremes in life you’ll be facing day to day as a newspaper photog. One minute you’re photographing a 108 year-old’s birthday and within an hour you’re at a murder scene. It’s the same with the equipment you need to have. You’re going to have to be heavily stacked in the extreme focal lengths.

In order to get close to the action and tell the story in one image, you need an extreme wide-angle lens. You need to have images with impact, and you can’t rely on Photoshop in post. A wide-angle gives you this. The perspective let’s the viewer walk into the frame to feel what it was like to be there.

Canon EOS 7D, EF-S10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM~ 1/250 sec,f/5.0, ISO 500.

You’ll be shooting lots of sports and concerts. And in the darkest places imaginable. The average high school gym is as bright as your living room at night. Minimum shutter speed to freeze action is around 1/500 sec. So you’ll need a fast extreme telephoto. Industry standard is a 300mm f2.8.

Canon EOS-1D Mark IV, EF 300mm f/2.8 L IS USM, 1/1250 sec., f/4.0, 1600 ISO

Another workhorse is the 70-200mm f2.8. You’ll be using it all the time. A great investment. Stay away from the IS (image stabilizaion) version of this lens. You don’t need it and it will save you 500 bucks. Learn to hold still and use the proper stance for shooting with a telephoto. In news your subject is always moving so IS won’t help there either.

Canon EOS-1D Mark III,Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8 L USM~ 1/320 sec, f 2.8 ISO 3200

Invest in fast, extreme lenses. And lenses ARE an investment. You can use them for decades. Technology doesn’t advance for lenses like it does with camera bodies.
Try to buy new. If you have to, you can find used lenses. Get the three lenses mentioned here, you’ll be set. Lenses are expensive. But it’s a good test to see who’ll sacrifice life’s spending temptations to get into the biz. No snowboards or motorcycles for you!!!!!

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